Writing “Cold eMails” that get a response!

Writing Cold emails that get a response!

Woo! Writing emails is easy, getting a response is a challengeAny email that you send out needs to have a precise objective. Writing cold emails that get a response in more of a science that you can easily master.

If you are looking to write one to one personal emails, read this.

One of the best ways to keep things short and sweet is to write like a real human.

  • What would be a possible objective? 
  • Getting them to say “Yes” or “Ok” to something that you want them to
  • Click on a “Link” or a “Button”
  • Getting a Meeting/ Appointment Fixing
  • Why should someone open the email?

What’s in it for them? What are you offering that will give them the interest to spend a minute or more on reading the email that you sent. Writing cold emails that get a response is a science. keep reading…

(TINSTAFL – There is no such thing as free lunch)

Some Questions to introspect:

  • How do you get them to open your email?
  • How many emails do you get in a day 50, 100, 200 or more…
  • How many of them do you open? Which ones get you to open them?

Think about this for a second… Go visit your inbox and come back with some of the subject lines that got you to open them. What got you to open them?

  • Curiosity
  • A bold statement
  • A mention of your name or your friend’s name
  • Giving you something of value
  • Story

Writing Subject Lines that Get Attention!

Keep in mind that the subject line’s aim is to get them to open the email. The subject line as much as possible should have some connection with the content that you have in the body of the email. If you can’t have a direct connection, so be it and try different variations before you deep dive.

Length of the Subject line

Keep it max 5 – 8 words. Why? People need to be able to see the subject line on their phones and quickly decide that they want to open the email.

Pick a topic that’s currently hot for your audience, people can connect with it

  • Have you watched Infinity War?
  • Why was the ending of Infinity War ambiguous?

Can you spin a story that links with the movie? Possible themes could be:

  • Teams, Outperform
  • Helping you when you really need it
  • Overcoming challenges like the ones faced by Avengers
  • There are Thanos everywhere, how do you overcome it

Pick an area that will interest your audience:

Research on your audience to see what areas they enjoy, what would you like to help them with. What is the outcome of the help that you will be giving them with your offer, product or service? Some examples below. Create 3 different subject lines and do a pilot to see which ones get you the best open rates.

  • Instant Savings of 30% on your order
  • Make time for that Vacation with this
  • Don’t buy anything till you read this
  • <First Name> , It’s Time to Re-invent
  • Hoping to help  (This is very open-ended, people tend to be confused, whether you want help or are asking for help)

Coming to the Body of the email:

Everyone is busy and their inbox is overflowing. Don’t make things even worse for them. Try and keep your emails short, and to the point. Would you read a four-paragraph essay from someone that you’ve never talked to before? You probably won’t.

Writing cold emails that get a response
Writing cold emails that get a response

Framing the email

  • Introduction & Offer/Story/ Benefit
  • Validation
  • Ask
  • Close
  • Formatting (Key factor in writing cold emails that get a response)
  • Reading on Phone

Introduction:

Hi <Name> ,
I came across your <Company Name> and wanted to speak to on how we helped Company Name by reducing ____ by _____

Or

Hello <Name>,
I know that with your current responsibilities you must be hard on time. We helped other <Designation> who are working with <Company A, Company B> and increase ______ by ____.

Or

Did you know that <Company Name> has built a new product that is going to market soon? We work with companies like <Company A, Company B> helping them build these products quickly.
(If you noticed, I have combined the introduction & offer/story/benefit making it shorter).

Validation:

While we engaged with <your company name> in building our product/ helping with our challenge, they were extremely professional and we were able to reduce/ increase _____.
Jim, Designation – Company Name.

Working with the product from <your company name>, it helped us solve the <challenge>, thereby helping us increase/reduce _____
Bob, Designation – Company Name.

Ask:

“I’d like to follow up about this with a quick phone call. We can cover the important issues in 15 minutes. Can I call you next Tuesday or Wednesday at 9 am EST?”

Or a better way to Ask is

“I can meet on Monday or Tuesday between 9 am and 11 am at Starbucks on 8th & 9th. If that doesn’t work, tell me what does, and I’ll make it happen.”

Close:

A simple structure that you can follow. Using a title like “Sales, Marketing, Account Manager” is a turn-off. It is advisable to use a title that reflects what is the end outcome you deliver to your customers.

Thank you,
<Your Name>
<Chief Strategy Officer/ Chief Problem Solver> <Company Name>
City, Phone number.
Website Address
Latest Blog Link

Example:

Thank You,
Jim Barrel,
Chief Success Manager
57W 57N, NY
+1 123 456 7890
www.domainname.com
Read On: How <Company Name> tripled their sales in a Quarter without any capital investment.

Formatting

Keep in mind, formatting your email to read easily with legible fonts make a huge difference in your open rates. Just improving that can help you see 5 – 10% higher opens & click-throughs.

Writing cold emails that get a response
Most people read their emails on the phone

Reading on Phone

Most people who are like you would read their emails on the go. How quickly can they read your email? Will it elicit a response? Send the email to your colleagues and test it out before you finally send it out.

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Hope this article “writing cold emails that get a response” helps you uncover new prospects. Testing multiple subject lines, with a change in text and context can make a huge difference to your open rates.

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